X Cinch Chest Tie Tutorial

This is an ideal tie for beginners, using only a larks head to start, reverse tensions at the rear, cinches at the front and a half hitch to finish. It is a decorational tie, but it allows you to practice tension and cinches. The arms in front position is often more comfortable than having the hands tied behind the back and can usually be sustained for longer periods of time. Feel free to use half hitches at the rear to lock your wraps in place as you go if you are struggling with the tension. There are variants of this tie you can play with by creating weaves where the ropes cross and by adding another x-formation on the arms. Why not have a go at adapting this tie and see what you can come up with? This tie in its present form is NOT suitable for suspension.

  • Place the bight of the rope at the centre of the back and take the running end over the right shoulder, across the body diagonally and create a larks head at the rear. (Pass the running end through the bight)

  • Create a reverse tension by taking the running end back on itself and follow the line of the first rope from the bottom of the left arm to the top of the right arm.

  • Create a reverse tension at the rear and take the running end down towards the bottom of the right arm, across the body to the top of the left arm.

  • Create a reverse tension at the rear. I've not photographed the remaining steps at the rear since I just continued to create reverse tensions. You can secure each wrap using a friction of your choice if you'd prefer, I just kept it simple and used this tie as an exercise in maintaining tension.

  • Take your running end up to the top of the left arm and follow the line of the previous wrap diagonally across the body to the lower right arm. You may want to weave where the wraps cross in the centre if you prefer.

  • Create a reverse tension at the rear and pass the rope high up under the right arm, but be very careful not to tug at the armpit area and exit below the top wrap as shown. Take the running end over the top wrap, keeping the wrap as flat as you can and pass the rope back under the right arm, again being careful of the armpit area. Take your running end to the rear where you've guessed it...create a reverse friction.

  • I chose to then create the next cinch on the lower right wrap purely for speed of tying and for aesthetics at the rear. (Feel free to tie the next cinch on the left hand top wrap if you'd prefer). Pass the rope under the right arm and exit the rope below the bottom wrap.

  • Pass the rope over the lower right hand wrap and pass it back under the arm. Take the rope straight across the back to the left arm. Pass the rope under the left arm and exit underneath the top wrap. Again, be very careful around the armpit area.

  • Create your cinches for the left upper and lower wrap in the same way as you did for the right hand side.

  • Once you have completed all four cinches, create a reverse tension at the rear and then pass the running end back under the left arm below the left lower cinch, across the body between the arms and the body and exit between the wrists.

  • Create a cinch from top to bottom this time, simply because you need the rope to exit at the bottom ready to take it up to the wrists.

  • Take the rope up between the body and the arms and exit to the right of the right wrist. Pass it diagonally across the hands towards the left thumb. At this stage I got my rope model to open her fists and entrap the rope in her fists. (This leaves fingers free for other ties later).

  • Take the rope across to the right thumb, and take it diagonally down to towards the left wrist. Pass it horizontally across the inner wrists and and then follow the lines you have created to form the X. You can either weave the X at the hands or cinch it from bottom to top. I preferred the cinching over the weave.

  • Pass the rope between the body and the arms and take it under the right arm, below the lower right cinch and finish your tie at the rear with a half hitch. Tidy up all your wraps, flattening them out where they may have bunched up at the cinch areas.